Shared on Facebook – Redux

There is another footnote to this story…

photo

R54605, Payer, Philippe Cpl. enlisted: October 10,1939.

With information on the back.

photo verso

Corporal Payer is the man on the right. According to the caption we are in 1941.

St-Hubert P. Que

Été 1941

Moi et mes hommes ce que l’on appelle un Crew

L’avion est un Tiger Shark

spit Fire

I am sure we are at the St-Hubert airbase in 1941, but this is not a Spitfire on this photo. It’s an American P-40 Kittyhawk bearing the code VW.

There were few P-40 Kittyhawk in Canada.

Very rare photos on the Internet. These are from the personal collection of Leonard Weston who would have served in Alaska!

His son had shared them so everyone could see them on the Internet.

What golden opportunity then to share this incredible photo taken in June 1941 at St-Hubert.

photo mod

R54605, Payer, Philippe Cpl. enlisted: October 10,1939

No 13 SFTS St-Hubert

No. 13 SFTS St. Hubert

Footnote

Comment left by a knowledgeable reader

Hi Pierre

They are indeed Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawks. The VW indicates 118 Squadron.  The photo with the Kitty in the glassed hanger was probably taken in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia where 118 was stationed before it went to Western Air Command in June, 1942.  (Although it could be Rockcliffe where they formed).  It is unusual to see the shark teeth nose on a 118 aircraft, a design they discontinued out west (14 Squadron was also using that design out west when they got there in March, 1942.

The other photos, also Kittyhawks (all Mark 1s), were taken, most likely on Annette Island, Alaska where 118 was stationed until they went overseas to become 438 Squadron flying Typhoons. The photographs were all taken before October 31, 1942 when the order went out to remove the squadron identification letters on all RCAF aircraft.

There must be hundreds of shots like these slumbering in shoeboxes in attics all over Canada. I wish there was a way to get them out.

Best regards

Bill Eull

www.RCAF111fSquadron.com

 

Now this is the other footnote…

Hi

Yeah… what about those teeth?

Maybe one of your readers will come up with an interesting theory or fact.

An interesting sidebar: the USAAF Flying Tigers unit in Burma was run by Gen Clare Lee Chennault. It was his son, Maj. Jack Chennault that commanded USAAF 11th Squadron in the Aleutians and incorporated the Canadian units into the effort. In Burma they used the shark teeth design but in the Aleutians, 11 Squadron used a Tiger mouth (it wasn’t nearly as dramatic) But it was the RCAF 14 Squadron that used the sharks teeth in Alaska and the Aleutians.

They were all P-40 Es (Mk1) although in 111 Squadron ’s diary they were frequently, in 1941, called P40 Ds. I don’t know why.

AL 785 flown into St. Hubert and I think across the country. (Quite a thing, that!) by F/O Grant

AK 857 P/O Johnstone

AK 803 P/O Handley

AL 226 Sgt O’Brien

AL 220 W/O2 Dickson Dickson en route crash-landed near Sudbury

AK 779 P/O Banting I think Banting crash-landed near Sudbury at the same time. These seem to have been the only accidents. Neither pilot was hurt; both were flying in their regular shifts at Annette in the coming days. But I don’t see either a/c on strength again.

AK 845 P/O Studholme

AL 152 Sgt Manzer

AK 797 P/O Baxter

AL 210 P/O Wilson

AK 815 P/O Ivans

AL 224 Sgt Brooker

The others went on to Montreal.

Here is the cross country route flown by these tight little one-man a/c:

Dartmouth to Penfield Ridge (June 6)

Penfield Ridge to Montreal “

Also Penfield Ridge to St. Hubert June 6

St. Hubert to North Bay June 7

North Bay to Purquois June 8

Purquois to Armstrong “

Armstrong to Winnipeg “

Winnipeg to Regina June 8 or 9

Regina to Lethbridge June 9

Lethbridge to Edmonton June 10 They hung out in Edmonton A&E tests etc. They did no flying in Edmonton from June 13 -20

Edmonton to Prince George June 21

Prince George  to Annette Island “

Very impressive achievement!

Bill

www.RCAF111fSquadron.com

 

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Shared on Facebook

R54605, Payer, Philippe Cpl. enlisted: October 10,1939.

With information on the back.

photo verso

Corporal Payer is the man on the right. According to the caption we are in 1941.

St-Hubert P. Que

Été 1941

Moi et mes hommes ce que l’on appelle un Crew

L’avion est un Tiger Shark

spit Fire

I am sure we are at the St-Hubert airbase in 1941, but this is not a Spitfire on this photo. It’s an American P-40 Kittyhawk bearing the code VW.

There were few P-40 Kittyhawk in Canada.

Very rares photos on the Internet. These are from the personal collection of Leonard  Weston who would have served in Alaska!

His son had shared them so everyone could see them on the Internet.

What golden opportunity then to share this incredible photo taken in June 1941 at St-Hubert.

photo mod

R54605, Payer, Philippe Cpl. enlisted: October 10,1939

No 13 SFTS St-Hubert

No. 13 SFTS St. Hubert

Footnote

Comment left by a knowledgeable reader

Hi Pierre

They are indeed Curtiss P-40 Kittyhawks. The VW indicates 118 Squadron.  The photo with the Kitty in the glassed hanger was probably taken in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia where 118 was stationed before it went to Western Air Command in June, 1942.  (Although it could be Rockcliffe where they formed).  It is unusual to see the shark teeth nose on a 118 aircraft, a design they discontinued out west (14 Squadron was also using that design out west when they got there in March, 1942.

The other photos, also Kittyhawks (all Mark 1s), were taken, most likely on Annette Island, Alaska where 118 was stationed until they went overseas to become 438 Squadron flying Typhoons. The photographs were all taken before October 31, 1942 when the order went out to remove the squadron identification letters on all RCAF aircraft.

There must be hundreds of shots like these slumbering in shoeboxes in attics all over Canada. I wish there was a way to get them out.

Best regards

Bill Eull

www.RCAF111fSquadron.com

The pilot who shot down Godfrey Alan McKoy on 26 January 1943

wpid-1_7932_17e0aac.jpg

1_7932_17e0aac~2

He never stood  a chance…

wpid-standard-1.jpg.jpeg

http://www.luftwaffe.cz/gallandw.html

gallandw2

Wilhelm-Ferdinand “Wutz” Galland

Excerpt

Wilhelm-Ferdinand “Wutz” Galland was born on 23 October 1914 at Bochum. He enlisted in the Luftwaffe in 1935 serving with a flak regiment. Galland participated in the invasion of the Low Countries and France with a flak regiment before volunteering for flight training at the end of 1940. He competed operational training with Ergänzungsgruppe/JG 26 and reported to II./JG 26 on 27 June 1941. JG 26 was under command of his brother Adolf Galland (104 victories, RK-Br). His younger brother Paul Galland (17 victories, killed in action 31 October 1942) was also serving with the unit. Assigned to 6./JG 26, “Wutz” scored his first victory on 23 July 1941, shooting down a RAF Spitfire fighter near Hesdin. By the end of 1941 his victory total had climbed to three. On 5 May 1942, Galland was appointed Staffelkapitän of 5./JG 26. He had eight victories to his credit. On 2 June, he claimed two Spitfires shot down over the Somme Estuary to record his ninth and 10th victories. Galland recorded his 20th victory on 4 December when he shot down another Spitfire near Boulogne. His score had risen to 21 by the end of 1942. Hauptmann Galland was appointed Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG 26 on 3 January 1943. On 13 January he claimed a Spitfire shot down, but, it was, in fact, a 6th Staffel Bf 109G-4 piloted by Unteroffizier Johann Irlinger. The mistaken identification of the Messerschmitt for a Spitfire cost Irlinger his life. The incident was cleaned up for the official records… On 28 January, Galland received the Deutsches Kreuz in Gold for 24 victories. He recorded his 30th victory on 15 February, when he shot down a Spitfire near Ramsgate. Galland was awarded the Ritterkreuz on 18 May 1943 for 35 victories.

Godfrey Alan McKoy was his 24th victory.

Who remembers Mervyn Jack Mills? – Harvards at the NZ Warbirds show

Brian is sharing these pictures he took in New Zeland yestarday.

 

Brian had shared a whole lot on this blog about his uncle.

ORIGINAL

His nephew does.

He sent me this message with a few pictures.

I found this an enlightening account of night flying in a Spitfire.

http://rcafdunnville.blogspot.co.nz/2013/06/jimmy-osborne.html

I live about 15 minutes away from Papakura and it used to have an Army Camp there.

Most of all I noted that he mentioned about five New Zealanders won a commission.

My Uncle Mervyn Jack Mills’ file says that his commissioned of Pilot Officer superceded that of Sergeant.

Scrolling down to Course 44 and looking at names of the New Zealanders.

I was reminded of James E Shields in the attached files.

Hope you find them interesting.

Regards, Brian Vonlanthen.

Jimmy Osborne was in Course 44 at No. 6 SFTS Dunnville with Mervyn.

Mervyn Jack Mills banquet document 1 Mervyn Jack Mills banquet document

Flight Lieutenant Rodolphe Lafrenière’s logbook

These pages go with Rodolphe Lafrenière’s pictures I posted before.

 

One of reasons I write blogs about WWII is pictures like this one I posted yesterday on my blog about 425 Alouette.

Click here.

That plane was not in that squadron although I could make up a story.

One day I will be able to tell you more about that airplane. Continue reading

No. 20 E.F.T.S., Oshawa

It has been a long time since I have written a post on this blog.

I had one on the back burner and I had forgotten to post it.

Bad day flying

I only write when I have something to share.

I have something that might be of interest to someone who was stationed at No. 20 E.F.T.S., Oshawa or a relative.

   Logbook pages 3-4

These are two pages taken from this logbook.

Logbook cover

This is Rodolphe Lafrenière, a Handley Page Halifax pilot with 425 Alouette Squadron during WWII.

Rodolphe Lafreni+¿re

His son André shared his father’s logbook and several photos with me.

None were taken at No. 20 EFTS Oshawa. These are two I found on the Internet.

OshPL002289292f

OshPL002290608f

These logbook pages are interesting artefacts because we have the name of Rodolphe Lafrenière’s instructor: WO2 J. P. Lumsden.

Maybe someone knew this instructor, and maybe he or she has pictures to share. This is why I am writing this post on this blog about the BCATP.

There were also others names.

Flight Sergeant John Mac Keller, instructor, and Bert Pearson, engineer in charge.

If you have any information, you can contact me using this form.