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Artwork by Paul Tuttle

The painting was created for the Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum’s collection. It depicts a BCATP Fleet Finch in the circuit at EFTS No. 17 Stanley, Nova Scotia.

Paul Tuttle has won awards with his artwork and it has also been collected and published internationally. He concentrates primarily on aviation or nature/wildlife subject matter. In regards to aviation art, Paul Tuttle’s objective is to preserve aviation history with his work. Many of his paintings can be found in a number of aviation museums including the Smithsonian in Washington DC.

Use the search button on the right side to look for someone’s name among 200 posts I wrote about the BCATP.
Use the comment section or the contact form below.

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Still unknown RCAF photographer

Chris wrote this earlier in 2018. He has even more photos to share. Click on the link at the end of this post.

Hello Pierre,

I have attached the photos of the fellow who I believe took the rest of the pictures that I have. The one picture shows him as an AC at #1 AOS Malton.

I have one post card type photo that says the photographer is Claude Hannan but no association to the rest of the photos. I’m not sure if that’s who I’m looking for.

I have no other information beyond that.

Cheers,

Chris

https://www.flickr.com/photos/156388614@N08/albums

S/L David L. (“Bud”) Quinn, CD

I remembered that name…

Lest We Forget

Someone posted this comment…

S/L David L. (“Bud”) Quinn, CD

Armament Officer in Charge of Gunnery
No.7 Bombing and Gunnery School, Paulson, Manitoba
June 1941 to July 30, 1942

My father (above) probably knew both P/O Gagnon and LAC Norm Pringle.

Thanks to your blog, I have discovered more about my father’s wartime service. After transferring from the militia (7th Toronto Field Artillery), he joined the RCAF in 1934, starting over at the bottom as an LAC. He was an original member of what was then No. 10 Sqn (later 110 and ultimately 400 Sqn.) when it first formed up. He had risen to the rank of F/Sgt by the time of the declaration of war and was commissioned shortly after. He served throughout the war, managing to find a way to get his pilot’s wings and an overseas posting, and served with RAF 2nd TAF HQ in Europe. As…

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November 9, 1941 – Paulson, Manitoba – Update

A comment made about this post:

This is somewhat unsettling to me and very strange. My father, David L. « Bud » Quinn, who was a Flight Lieutenant at the time of the death of LAC Heal, may have witnessed this accident. He was the Armament Officer in Charge of Gunnery at No. 7 B&GS at Paulson from June 1941 until the end of July 1942.

He described to me once seeing one of his armourers turning without looking and walking into the rotating prop of an aircraft. He called out to him, but not in time. The description of the accident in the medical examiner’s official report above is consistent with how my father described it, namely « partial decapitation & decerebration ». He said that at the time it shook him to the core. Decades later he could still not get the memory out of his head.

May they all now rest in peace! Lest we forget.

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Remembering LAC Kenneth Edgar Heal…

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Edgar Dörre – Update

Here is the message that has just been posted on a WWII forum. It was about a German pilot who shot down Mervin Jack Mills.

I wonder who put the picture of Erbo von Kageneck on this website:

https://bcatp.wordpress.com/2014/07/01/edgar-dorre/, pretending that it was a photo of Edgar Dörre…

It’s evidently Erbo von Kageneck:

http://deutsches-afrikakorps.blogspot.com/2011/02/oberleutnant-erbo-graf-von-kageneck.html

I had taken this photo from the Internet.

I stand corrected.

Remembrance Day 2015

About No. 1 Technical Training School, St. Thomas

As Canadian as can be

In honour of Remembrance Day, I’ve decided to post some more about my Dad, Thomas Hogue, and his time in the R.C.A.F. (Royal Canadian Air Force). Dad, a welder with Canadian National Railways, spent time at the No. 1 Technical Training School in St. Thomas, Ontario, where the R.C.A.F. trained ground crews as part of an initiative known as the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. St. Thomas is in southwestern Ontario.

Google map showing St. Thomas, Ontario Google map showing St. Thomas, Ontario

The Technical Training School was established in 1939. It was housed in what had originally been the brand new Ontario Psychiatric Hospital. When war broke out, the patients were transferred to other hospitals, and the complex acquired to train R.C.A.F. ground crews. There’s a great aerial photo of the buildings here from the Elgin County Archives.

Here’s a historical plaque commemorating the School.

Photograph by Alan L. Brown, Courtesy of ontarioplaques.com Photograph by Alan L. Brown, Courtesy of ontarioplaques.com

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